Wednesday, March 16, 2011

My First Prairie Doll Creation

Yesterday I mentioned that I finally got myself a pattern and low and behold even though I had gotten a pattern I actually didnt use one to make my set of 3 prairie dolls, which by the way, are for sale. The set of 3 is $25 and that includes shipping within the USA going priority mail with delivery confirmation. If your interested, leave me a comment.

Dolls on Left & Right measure 6" from head to bottom of body and doll in middle measures 8" from top of head to bottom.


Did you know:

Dolls made in North America, from the earliest primitive examples found at the sites of prehistoric villages, to those made in contemporary times, all share a handcrafted folkart tradition. Many of these dolls were made out of necessity from whatever scraps were on hand, and were substitutes for costly store-bought toys. Parents and children in Colonial America fashioned dolls from easily obtained items such as clothespins, corn husks, dried apples and rags.


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Tracy - Simple Living
My love of vintage goods, antiques
and handmade primitives!
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The Curling Iron...

The original inventor is lost in the mists of time but this much I have found out…
In 1866, Hiram Maxim applied for and obtained the first of many patents at age 26 for a hair curling iron. He also has a machine gun bearing his name.

Hiram Maxim 1840-1916.
Four years later, two Frenchmen, Maurice Lentheric and Marcel Grateau, used hot-air drying and heated curling tongs to make long-lasting Marcel waves. Twenty years later, Alexandre F. Godefroy, a French hairdresser, invented the hair dryer, composed of a bonnet attached to a flexible chimney that extended to a gas stove.

In 1905, Sarah Breedlove Walker created a cosmetic industry in Indianapolis, Indiana. She became the first African-American female millionaire in America after inventing a method for straightening hair using emollient creams and hot combs. In 1906, Charles L. Nessler, a German hairdresser working in London, applied a borax paste and curled hair with an iron to make the first permanent waves. This expensive process took a long twelve hours. Eight years later, Eugene Sutter adapted the method by designing a dryer that contained twenty heaters to do the job of waving more efficiently. Following Sutter was Gaston Boudou, who modified Sutter’s dryer and invented an automatic roller. By 1920, Rambaud, a Paris beautician, had perfected a system of curling and drying permed hair for softer, looser curls by using an electric hot-air dryer, an innovation of the period made by the Racine Universal Motor Company of Racine, Wisconsin.

Did you know:

The first made curling irons are actually still around and used to this day? Although the curling iron has evolved since Marcel's time, Marcel curling irons are still used today. They are mostly used by professional hair stylists because it is more user-friendly to have another person hold the handle and apply the pressure than to do it yourself.

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Tracy - Simple Living
My love of vintage goods, antiques
and handmade primitives!
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